Adweek Sucks Customer Reviews and Feedback

From Everything.Sucks

Adweek is a weekly American advertising trade publication that was first published in 1979. Adweek covers creativity, client-agency relationships, global advertising, accounts in review, and new campaigns. During this time, it has covered several notable shifts in technology, including cable television, the shift away from commission-based agency fees, and the Internet.

A reader under the name of SVP@Ogilvy shares his/her experience with Adweek APP in a review posted by APP STORE PREVIEW: "App Broken - do NOT buy a membership through the app I paid for a year subscription through the app and was not given a login or any way to access the content. Even worse when calling AdWeek they could not help and I had to go through an ordeal with Apple to process the refund and unsubscribe to something I paid for but never was granted access to."

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Former Employee - Staff says

"I worked at Adweek full-time for more than 8 years Cons: James Cooper is not CEO. Jim has been respected near and far for literally decades since he was a reporter himself. Adweek’s actual CEO, Jeff Litvack, is the exact opposite. Recently, these reviews appear to be planted significantly to position Adweek as a positive place to work. Make no mistake: It is not a good place to work. Previous complaints about management and leadership is specific to Litvack. Under Beringer Group’s ownership and Litvack’s leadership the past couple of years, Litvack has effectively pushed out and replaced nearly all of Adweek's staff of less than 100 people. There are many reviews talking about the company's poor management. To be very clear, those concerns are about Litvack. Adweek has an all-male leadership and finds ways to demoralize women. I say that fully knowing that 2 women are running the editorial side of Adweek. They have nowhere near enough power to fight for women staffers and break through to cause change. Working at Adweek as a woman means staring down a very bleak future with no possible career trajectory. For example. several damning HR complaints about men staffers have conveniently been pushed under the rug by Litvack. Adweek also recently lost a big reporter who covered the #metoo movement, leaving Adweek on more uncertain ground. Litvack has never been a journalist but you would never know that when meeting him. He has no idea how to run a media company and is a risk for anyone he works with. He is controlling, manic and interferes with everyone thinking that he can do anyone else's job and doesn’t trust his team. He calls, emails and communicates with staff at all hours of the day, requiring some staffers to constantly be on call. He has no boundries and doesn't show any interest in creating them. Run, don’t walk, away from him and Adweek. Fast."

Former Employee - Anonymous Employee says

"I worked at Adweek full-time for more than a year Cons: You will have more and more work thrown on top of you until you feel like you're literally drowning. And when you try to express that you're drowning, you're essentially told that everyone else is drowning, so you might as well grow some gills. There is absolutely no mobility at this company. Maybe you'll get a gift certificate for Starbucks. Maybe you'll be promised a "promotion" that's double the work with no raise. But don't expect to have your work recognized. The only time you'll be recognized is when you make a mistake, which you surely will when you're juggling three jobs at once. Everyone here is sad. Just so, so sad. And management doesn't care. You're expected to have undying loyalty for the company for absolutely no reason, while the company treats its employees like absolute garbage. Make no mistake: This company forced its entire staff to work in the office in the middle of construction, despite paint fumes sans ventilation. This company discriminates against women and people of color. Stay away."

Former Employee - N/A says

"I worked at Adweek full-time for more than 3 years Cons: All positive reviews written recently are solicited to be skewed as positive or delusional. Unless you are really desparate and need to jump from sinking ship to another sinking ship, that'd be the only reason why I any one should or want to work there. Otherwise, I wouldn't recommend any one close to be involved with this company due to the poisonous culture that stems from executive mangement and trickles down to demoralize all the good and talented employees that are behind the actual real work. Please listen - "Adweek is one of those places that you know soon that you've taken a wrong turn. I could tell of the disappointment on a few co-workers faces after a few days of them starting. There's no real culture to speak of to start, so you certainly won't feel part of a team or anything like that. " "A very boys' club attitude, so good luck if you've got ovaries. Very little planning except constantly dealing with the latest emergency that could have been avoided with some foresight and planning, or even just some extra information from the management team. No one is given the things they need to do their job well, and if they flounder, well, sucks to be you, no one is going to help you." "Adweek perpetuates a toxic, mysoginistic bro culture. It’s led by a male-dominated executive team that look out for other men at the top and puts people down who speak up. The company constantly overloads employees with more than they can handle, and when employees express concern of burnout, management doesn’t listen or care. Instead they pack on more work for people leading to unrest and unhappiness. Raising concerns or speaking up when you think something is wrong tends to lead to punishment." "Upper management lacked understanding to connect with employees and is hyper focused on sales" "-Nothing to make me want to stick around except job safety and nice coworkers -Lots of turnover lately""

Former Employee - Anonymous Employee says

"I worked at Adweek full-time for less than a year Cons: A very boys' club attitude, so good luck if you've got ovaries. Very little planning except constantly dealing with the latest emergency that could have been avoided with some foresight and planning, or even just some extra information from the management team. No one is given the things they need to do their job well, and if they flounder, well, sucks to be you, no one is going to help you. And if you're in sales, you're going to be fired. Don't expect a raise, but they will make promises about bonuses being given on a percentage points system in 2 years' time."

Former Employee - Anonymous Employee says

"I worked at Adweek full-time for more than 5 years Cons: Adweek perpetuates a toxic, mysoginistic bro culture. It’s led by a male-dominated executive team that look out for other men at the top and puts people down who speak up. The company constantly overloads employees with more than they can handle, and when employees express concern of burnout, management doesn’t listen or care. Instead they pack on more work for people leading to unrest and unhappiness. Raising concerns or speaking up when you think something is wrong tends to lead to punishment. Advancing at this company is also a challenge. Don’t expect to be promoted or get any type of raise, even cost of living, here. Employees are often not treated with respect and not given the encouragement to grow and learn at Adweek. The most community you’ll find here is from your fellow colleagues who are just as miserable as you are."

Former Employee - Anonymous Employee says

"I worked at Adweek full-time for less than a year Cons: Adweek is one of those places that you know soon that you've taken a wrong turn. I could tell of the disappointment on a few co-workers faces after a few days of them starting. There's no real culture to speak of to start, so you certainly won't feel part of a team or anything like that. Here's a bullet point of what you should know. - Within a couple months you should expect a new sales commission plans with a drastically lower payout percentage. - There are near zero sales leads to work off. It's unclear what the Adweek marketing team does aside from collect a paycheck. - Any qualified leads will go to the upper management to work even though they are in a management role, without a sales quota. - Adweek events will be canceled with little warning only a few weeks before they are to take place, leaving clients pissed and you sadly without a sales payout. Or a reduction in your quota. - Coworkers will quit or be fired. - And finally you will have to aggressively pursue Adweek for unpaid vacation days and outstanding sales commission."

Current Employee - N/A says

"I have been working at Adweek full-time for more than 3 years Cons: -No promotions -No culture -Cramped office space -Nothing to make me want to stick around except job safety and nice coworkers -Lots of turnover lately"

Current Employee - Rather Not Say says

"I have been working at Adweek full-time Cons: Leadership is very focused on themselves, but not focused on internal growth. There is a culture and conversation of diversity issue. The pay is not up to trade."

Former Employee - Manager says

"I worked at Adweek full-time for less than a year Cons: They've been jostled between new managements for too many years and the company culture suffered"

Former Employee - Anonymous Employee says

"I worked at Adweek full-time for less than a year Cons: High turnover rate. Management lacks insight."

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